Our Patron


     

His Excellency The Honourable Paul de Jersey AC
Governor of Queensland

The Governor was born in Brisbane in 1948, the third son of school teacher parents Ronald and Moya (both now deceased).

His Excellency won a Commonwealth Scholarship to The University of Queensland, and graduated with degrees in Arts in 1969 and Laws (with Honours) in 1971. Also in December 1971, the Governor married Kaye Brown. His Excellency and Mrs de Jersey have three children and three grandchildren.

The Governor was called to the Bar at the end of 1971 and was appointed as Her Majesty’s Counsel (QC) in 1981.

The Governor was appointed as a Judge of the Supreme Court of Queensland in 1985, when aged 36 years, becoming the 17th Chief Justice of Queensland on 17 February 1998, and served in that role for more than 16 years until 8 July 2014.

In recognition of his contribution to the Australian community, the Governor was appointed a Companion of the Order of Australia in 2000, and awarded a Centenary Medal in 2003. He holds honorary doctorates from The University of Queensland (2000) and the University of Southern Queensland (2008), and Griffith University (2014).

His Excellency was appointed the 26th Governor of Queensland on 29 July 2014.

From Cystic Fibrosis Morning Tea Speech (May 2015):

"Those who live with cystic fibrosis are overwhelmingly young because, tragically, the disorder cuts average life spans to half that of the broader community. Its diagnosis profoundly changes many lives in many ways. These are sombre and unsettling facts.

However, they have only spurred those in this room, and many others not present, to do their utmost in supporting fellow Queenslanders with cystic fibrosis.

Families of individuals with the condition, and the medical professionals who treat it, are at the forefront of this effort. But their best efforts would be far more problematic without the support of Cystic Fibrosis Queensland.

CFQ’s support programs seek to deal with the physical and psychological aspects of the condition. They support families in highly practical ways that make life, if not easier, then certainly less stressful.

CFQ also supports research that seeks to understand better the nature of the condition, to slow its impact and reduce its symptoms. Ultimately, of course, we all hope for a cure.

All this requires resources, and I am aware that sourcing funds to keep programs in operation is a constant challenge.

Yet I have no doubt that those involved in the work of Cystic Fibrosis Queensland are inspired in all they do by the courage and endurance of those who stare “65 roses” in the face every day, and their determination to wring the maximum out of life.

As Governor and Patron, I most sincerely thank the Board, medical advisers, staff, volunteers, sponsors and supporters of Cystic Fibrosis Queensland for the wonderful work they do in our communities. It is deeply appreciated."